Case Study: Three 3min Critical Power Tests

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, May 10, 2019 @ 10:05 AM

In the last blog post I discussed the use of a 3 minute critical power test to monitor, and dictate racing and training for cyclists. Just to recap, after warming up, begin the 3-minute all out test by shifting to a gear that will allow you to get the highest power output, ride as long and as hard as possible, shifting gears so that by the end of the three minutes you’re pedaling at your preferred cadence. Typically between 80-100rpm. Average the power output for the last 30s of the 3 minute test and use that as critical power, it’s as simple as that. In this blog post I want to detail the results of three 3 minute critical power tests that I did while wearing a Moxy monitor on my right VL. These tests were done to try to identify if there is a critical SmO2 as measured by Moxy and differentiate between HR and SmO2 signal.

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Topics: recovery, Critical power

Could a 3-minute critical power test replace FTP and CP testing?

Posted by Phil Batterson on Sun, Apr 28, 2019 @ 10:04 AM

Functional threshold power (FTP) tests have been used by cyclists to determine the highest sustainable power a rider can maintain for rides/races lasting anywhere from 30-90 minutes. Detailed - here - FTP is determined by either 90 or 95% of the power maintained for an 8 or 20 minute all out ride, respectively.

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Topics: Training

Case Study: Behind the Rocks Muscle Oxygenation Analysis

Posted by Phil Batterson on Sat, Apr 13, 2019 @ 12:04 PM

In the last blog post, I detailed my adventure through the back country of Utah, in the Behind the Rocks 30k. I explained the training leading up to the race, as well as the race itself, which left me begging for mercy with bilateral hamstring cramps 3 miles from the finish line. During the race, I was wearing a heart rate monitor, and Moxy monitor while also tracking speed, elevation, and running dynamics. In this post I want to explore the biometric data that was collected throughout the race to see if there were any indicators that cramps or decreases in performance were immanent. 

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Topics: Training

Behind the Rocks 30k Recap

Posted by Phil Batterson on Sun, Mar 31, 2019 @ 08:03 AM

Warning: The following post, as opposed to having technical physiology, is mainly a recap of the race I completed in Moab, Utah. And the suffering that ensued. Enjoy! Recently, I completed the Behind the Rocks 30k. A beautifully, brutal course consisting of sandy fire roads, washed out slab rock, technical descents,1600ft of climbing, massive rock pillars, and deep canyons, that leave participants in awe, wonder, and a whole world of hurt. 

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Topics: Altitude and Performance

The Lactic Acid Construct

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, Mar 15, 2019 @ 08:03 AM

Historical importance of Lactate

The discovery of lactic acid occurred in 1780 when Swedish Chemist, Carl Wilhelm Sheele was able to purify lactic acid from sour milk. Much scrutiny was placed upon his experimental conditions, but in 1810 his findings were verified when scientists discovered lactic acid in purified organic tissues such as milk, ox meat, and blood. However, it wasn’t until the 1920’s that lactic acid was researched in association with fatigue. Archibald Vivian Hill and Otto Meyerhoff, two pioneers of exercise physiology, showed that lactate (thought to be lactic acid) was created during times of high intensity exercise. This was generally accepted, and when Margaria et al. 1933 showed a relationship between lactic acid in the blood and hydrogen ion (H+) content during exercise. Thus, cementing the thought that lactic acid CAUSES fatigue.

 

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Topics: lactate

Case Study: Monitoring Changes in Oxygen Saturation from Altitude to Sea-Level

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, Mar 1, 2019 @ 16:03 PM

 

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Topics: Altitude and Performance

Altitude Training: Beneficial or Just Hot (Less Dense) Air?

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, Feb 15, 2019 @ 13:02 PM

Altitude Training a Primer

High altitude training is thought to improve performance. The apparent benefits of high-altitude training include: increases in the blood cell stimulating hormone erythropoietin (EPO), which leads to slow increases in red blood cell volume (RBC), and in turn can result in a higher hematocrit level (the proportion of blood that is made up of RBC), allowing the body to maintain higher blood oxygen concentrations during exercise. While this does occur with altitude exposure, the time course for these adaptations, if they do occur, is not short. A commentary by Duke et al. concluded that in order to elicit performance benefits from altitude, one must live at an altitude of 2,000 – 2,500m (~6,500 – 8,200ft), for > 20 hours daily, for a period of no less than 28 days. Meaning that a ‘stint’ to high altitude by going snowboarding for a week is not a sufficient amount of time to elicit the performance gains from altitude exposure. Furthermore, most high-altitude research lacks solid control populations, as well as placebo control, and some studies have incomplete study design leaving many researchers skeptical to the efficacy of altitude training.  

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Topics: Altitude and Performance

Case Study 2: Using Moxy to Dictate Power Training, Sets, Reps, and Recovery

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, Feb 1, 2019 @ 18:02 PM

We have recently explored the benefits of strength training as well as outlining how to implement strength training for endurance athletes. In the last blog post we explored how Moxy can be used to dictate an endurance/hypertrophy strength session. In this post I want to provide another case study, as to how I am currently using my Moxy Monitor to dictate my power-based weight lifting sessions. The strength training session was completed on Jan. 23th, and consisted of 4 sets of 15-20 reps of dumbbell snatches, lunge jumps, quick band rows, weighted oblique twists, and 4-6 reps of deadlift with 3-5min rest. The goal of the workout was to push SmO2, (moxy on right v.lateralis) as low as possible within the 15-20reps, as well as maintain top speed of movement (power), then recover, until SmO2 reached enhanced recovery, which means that SmO2 remained steady above baseline recovery.

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Topics: strength training

Case Study 1: Using Moxy to Dictate Strength Training, Sets, Reps, and Recovery

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, Jan 18, 2019 @ 09:01 AM

In the last blog post, we explored the benefits of strength training as well as outlining how to implement strength training for endurance athletes. In this post I want to provide a personal case study, as to how I am currently using my Moxy Monitor to dictate an endurance/hypertrophy-based weight lifting session. The first weight training session was completed on Dec. 24th, and consisted of 4 sets of 15-20 reps of lunges, renegade rows, Body weight squats, and weighted lunges with 30-90s rest. You can find the heart rate details on TrainingPeaks - here. The goal of the workout was to push SmO2, (with the Moxy on the right v.lateralis) as low as possible within the 15-20reps then recover, until SmO2 reached a peak and started to come back down. 

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Topics: warm up, strength training

Improving Endurance Performance by Strength Training

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, Jan 4, 2019 @ 16:01 PM

Consistent training is one of the hallmarks to success in most sports. This is especially true for endurance sports that require hours of repeated movements to elicit the necessary adaptations for an athlete to excel on race day. When injury occurs, athletes are left sidelined and unable to participate in the sport they love and have invested so much time into. The prevalence of injuries related to overuse in endurance sports is extremely high. With conservative estimations predicting that (19%) of runners [van der Worp et al. 2015], (11.5%) of cyclist [Dettori and Norvell 2006], and (~20%) of triathletes [Zwingenberger et al. 2013], will be injured each year. While there aren’t any promises of a magic pill that could get rid of injuries forever, one simple thing, that most, if not all endurance athletes should be doing regularly is strength training (ST).

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Topics: strength training