Case Study: Monitoring Changes in Oxygen Saturation from Altitude to Sea-Level

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, Mar 1, 2019 @ 16:03 PM

 

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Topics: Altitude and Performance

Altitude Training: Beneficial or Just Hot (Less Dense) Air?

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, Feb 15, 2019 @ 13:02 PM

Altitude Training a Primer

High altitude training is thought to improve performance. The apparent benefits of high-altitude training include: increases in the blood cell stimulating hormone erythropoietin (EPO), which leads to slow increases in red blood cell volume (RBC), and in turn can result in a higher hematocrit level (the proportion of blood that is made up of RBC), allowing the body to maintain higher blood oxygen concentrations during exercise. While this does occur with altitude exposure, the time course for these adaptations, if they do occur, is not short. A commentary by Duke et al. concluded that in order to elicit performance benefits from altitude, one must live at an altitude of 2,000 – 2,500m (~6,500 – 8,200ft), for > 20 hours daily, for a period of no less than 28 days. Meaning that a ‘stint’ to high altitude by going snowboarding for a week is not a sufficient amount of time to elicit the performance gains from altitude exposure. Furthermore, most high-altitude research lacks solid control populations, as well as placebo control, and some studies have incomplete study design leaving many researchers skeptical to the efficacy of altitude training.  

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Topics: Altitude and Performance

Case Study 2: Using Moxy to Dictate Power Training, Sets, Reps, and Recovery

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, Feb 1, 2019 @ 18:02 PM

We have recently explored the benefits of strength training as well as outlining how to implement strength training for endurance athletes. In the last blog post we explored how Moxy can be used to dictate an endurance/hypertrophy strength session. In this post I want to provide another case study, as to how I am currently using my Moxy Monitor to dictate my power-based weight lifting sessions. The strength training session was completed on Jan. 23th, and consisted of 4 sets of 15-20 reps of dumbbell snatches, lunge jumps, quick band rows, weighted oblique twists, and 4-6 reps of deadlift with 3-5min rest. The goal of the workout was to push SmO2, (moxy on right v.lateralis) as low as possible within the 15-20reps, as well as maintain top speed of movement (power), then recover, until SmO2 reached enhanced recovery, which means that SmO2 remained steady above baseline recovery.

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Topics: strength training

Case Study 1: Using Moxy to Dictate Strength Training, Sets, Reps, and Recovery

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, Jan 18, 2019 @ 09:01 AM

In the last blog post, we explored the benefits of strength training as well as outlining how to implement strength training for endurance athletes. In this post I want to provide a personal case study, as to how I am currently using my Moxy Monitor to dictate an endurance/hypertrophy-based weight lifting session. The first weight training session was completed on Dec. 24th, and consisted of 4 sets of 15-20 reps of lunges, renegade rows, Body weight squats, and weighted lunges with 30-90s rest. You can find the heart rate details on TrainingPeaks - here. The goal of the workout was to push SmO2, (with the Moxy on the right v.lateralis) as low as possible within the 15-20reps then recover, until SmO2 reached a peak and started to come back down. 

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Topics: warm up, strength training

Improving Endurance Performance by Strength Training

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, Jan 4, 2019 @ 16:01 PM

Consistent training is one of the hallmarks to success in most sports. This is especially true for endurance sports that require hours of repeated movements to elicit the necessary adaptations for an athlete to excel on race day. When injury occurs, athletes are left sidelined and unable to participate in the sport they love and have invested so much time into. The prevalence of injuries related to overuse in endurance sports is extremely high. With conservative estimations predicting that (19%) of runners [van der Worp et al. 2015], (11.5%) of cyclist [Dettori and Norvell 2006], and (~20%) of triathletes [Zwingenberger et al. 2013], will be injured each year. While there aren’t any promises of a magic pill that could get rid of injuries forever, one simple thing, that most, if not all endurance athletes should be doing regularly is strength training (ST).

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Topics: strength training

Finding the Limiter with Muscle Oxygen Monitoring to Maximize Athletic Performance

Posted by Roger Schmitz on Mon, Dec 31, 2018 @ 14:12 PM

shutterstock_599697680We often talk about identifying physiologic limiters with Moxy.  We can determine if an athlete is limited by oxygen delivery or oxygen utilization and we can further discern if a supply limitation is due to the cardiac or the pulmonary system.

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Topics: Training

The Relationship Between Oxygen and Phosphocreatine Recovery Kinetics

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, Dec 21, 2018 @ 15:12 PM

Three Energy Systems

There are three energy systems in the body, all using different substrates to synthesize adenosine triphosphate  (ATP) which is the energy currency of the cell. Without ATP our muscles would not be able to contract making locomotion impossible. Briefly, the three energy systems are:

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Topics: PCr, phosphocreatine, recovery

How to use Moxy to Monitor Warm-up Status

Posted by Phil Batterson on Sun, Dec 9, 2018 @ 13:12 PM

In Part 1: Creating a Proper Warm-up the principles of a proper warm-up were discussed as well as a simple FTP based warm-up model which allows for the creation of a simple, effective warm-up. A warm-up should leave an athlete feeling invigorated, and prepared both mentally and physically for the hard work ahead, whether that be a race or tough workout. 

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Topics: warm up

Creating a Proper Warm-Up

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, Nov 23, 2018 @ 20:11 PM

The purpose of a warm-up is simple: to prepare for the workout or race in the best way possible. A warm-up should leave an athlete feeling invigorated, and prepared both mentally and physically for the hard work ahead. Physiologically, a warm-up literally increases body temperature, allowing for a number of benefits which can lead to enhanced sprint times, jump heights, and time to exhaustion during maximal aerobic exercise (Bishop 2003). The proposed reasons as to why increasing body temperature can lead to better performance are: 1) Increasing power output through accelerating metabolic reactions; 2) allowing muscle and tendons to become more pliable through a decrease in viscoelasticity; and 3) allowing for oxygen to be off-loaded from hemoglobin more readily to active muscle (Bishop 2003). With this in mind one of the main purposes of a proper warm-up should be to increase body temperature without increasing it too much. Unfortunately, many athletes get to the starting line in an ill prepared manner, putting them at a disadvantage before the race has even started.

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Topics: warm up

Convergence of Moxy and Portable VO2

Posted by Roger Schmitz on Sun, Nov 4, 2018 @ 16:11 PM

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Topics: Training