Perfecting the Pedal Stroke

Posted by Stuart Giere on Mon, Oct 14, 2013 @ 12:10 PM


For cyclists, there is much more to pedal stroke than simply making the cranks go round. Yet it is very difficult to determine what professional cyclists are actually doing just by watching them, especially given both the speed of the pedal itself and the almost invisible changes in the force applied to it. However, by making a few subtle changes to the pedaling movement, you can realize a huge difference in power and efficiency over time.

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4 Killer Bike Trainer Workouts

Posted by Stuart Giere on Fri, Oct 4, 2013 @ 06:10 AM


Many people use bike trainer workouts as a chance to exercise while they are engaged in some other task such as watching TV or working on their laptops. This results in spending a long time on the indoor bike trainer performing moderate impact exercise which, as any athlete should know, does not serve as a good workout and can actually be detrimental to one's fitness.

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Does Inspiratory Muscle Training Improve VO2 Max?

Posted by Roger Schmitz on Mon, Sep 30, 2013 @ 13:09 PM

The concept of inspiratory muscle training makes sense: because endurance sports cause breathing to become more difficult, learning to breathe more efficiently and avoid fatigue in breathing muscles should enable athletes to move faster. However, evidence as to whether or not this is true is still scarce. While several studies have attempted to find the answer, most have used only a small number of subjects and have had a weak experimental design.

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Indoor Bike Trainers: A Brief Overview

Posted by Stuart Giere on Fri, Sep 27, 2013 @ 08:09 AM

For those of you who have been trying to figure out the distinction, indoor bike trainers are functionally comparable to stationary bikes; the main difference is that with an indoor bike trainer, you are simply attaching an external device to your regular bicycle rather than utilizing a totally separate piece of gym equipment. Indoor bike trainers are sometimes used by cyclists for warming up and cooling down before or after a race, but they are more often used by endurance athletes either out of preference or when weather conditions do not allow for outdoor riding.

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9 Benefits of Indoor Cycling

Posted by Roger Schmitz on Wed, Sep 25, 2013 @ 06:09 AM

 

Cyclists and triathletes are increasingly turning to indoor cycling (aka “spinning”), with many now doing the majority of their training indoors, preferring to head outdoors only for races. Even for those who find cycling on a stationary bike dull compared to mountain biking or spending time out on the road, indoor cycling is often a necessity during the off-season, when the weather is bad and darkness comes early.

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How Cyclists Benefit with Aero Position and Respiratory Muscle Training

Posted by Roger Schmitz on Thu, Jun 13, 2013 @ 06:06 AM

 

Competitive cyclists and triathletes are keenly interested in the idea of aerodynamic posture, or aero position: the practice of adjusting their on-bike positioning, clothing and equipment to reduce drag. However, there is often too great an emphasis on aero position for both professional-level time trialists and amateurs, according to new research by Dr. Iñigo San Millán. Typically, athletes spend huge amounts of time in a wind tunnel to determine their technically fastest aero position without taking into account metabolic factors that may significantly impact athletic performance. In fact, to describe cyclists who base their time trial position solely on aerodynamic data, Dr. San Millán coined the term "wind tunnel trap."

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Relationship Between Hbdiff, TSI, and SmO2

Posted by Roger Schmitz on Wed, Apr 24, 2013 @ 13:04 PM

We’ve had a few issues come up comparing readings from Portamon and Moxy Monitor.  I’ve looked into these issues a bit from a technical perspective. I’d like to share what I’ve found so far.

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Does the Brain Control Running Pace?

Posted by Roger Schmitz on Fri, Apr 12, 2013 @ 13:04 PM

Every runner has an individual running pace he or she naturally falls into during a steady run that lasts for a set distance or time. This pace changes over time as the athlete's fitness improves or declines, and also varies slightly on different days according to fatigue accumulated from previous training sessions.

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Using the Central Governor Model to Better Understand Fatigue

Posted by Roger Schmitz on Tue, Apr 2, 2013 @ 07:04 AM

Fatigue leading from physical exertion has traditionally been attributed to a depletion of oxygen and carbohydrates or a buildup of lactic acid. Based on this theory, the most promoted model since the mid-1920s has been the Cardiovascular/Anaerobic model proposed by A. V. Hill and associates. Used by scientists, coaches, and athletes, the model indicates that a lack of oxygen to the working muscles limits exercise performance. For this reason, VO2 max, lactate threshold, and running economy are used to discuss training and physiology.

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The Difference Between Functional Threshold Power and Lactate Threshold

Posted by Roger Schmitz on Mon, Mar 25, 2013 @ 13:03 PM

There are two thresholds used to describe the effects of exercise intensity on the body of an athlete; these are known as the anaerobic or lactate threshold and functional threshold power. The lactate threshold is difficult to detect consciously as it refers to specific metabolic changes, although it can be determined with accuracy using specialized tests. Functional threshold power, however, can actually be physically felt by an athlete during training.

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