Identifying Unilateral Differences During Cycling with Moxy

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, May 24, 2019 @ 13:05 PM

Injuries are one of the major causes of stagnation or lack of progress during training. I am sure many of you have been there, you are working very hard towards your next big goal race, then, during one of your major training sessions you feel the start of a dull ache in the front of your knee. Your first thought is “Oh it’s nothing, just a little soreness from all the hard work I have been putting in.” The next day you can barely walk without shooting pain from your knee to your hip. You take a day off, rest, ice, and foam roll, and next thing you know it’s been three weeks of no concerted training. The next time you complete a solid training session you feel as if you lost ALL of your progress. Any athlete who has trained for an extended period of time has experienced the pain and disappointment of an overuse injury. For those of you who have experienced this the main recommendation from most coaches, trainers, or doctors, is to get more rest and don’t push yourself as hard. Essentially, you need to recover harder and smarter. While I believe that proper rest and recovery is EXTREMELY important to longevity in any athletic pursuit, I don’t think it’s the only piece of the puzzle, especially if you continually get injuries only occurring on one side of the body. The prediction of an overuse injury is almost impossible and it’s extremely challenging to identify how or why these types of injuries occur. While I have written a lot about using Moxy to dictate training I want to start to explore how Moxy could be used to identify unilateral differences in muscle oxygenation, and how this could be used to prevent or potentially identify weaknesses that could cause overuse injuries.

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Topics: Training

Could a 3-minute critical power test replace FTP and CP testing?

Posted by Phil Batterson on Sun, Apr 28, 2019 @ 10:04 AM

Functional threshold power (FTP) tests have been used by cyclists to determine the highest sustainable power a rider can maintain for rides/races lasting anywhere from 30-90 minutes. Detailed - here - FTP is determined by either 90 or 95% of the power maintained for an 8 or 20 minute all out ride, respectively.

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Topics: Training

Case Study: Behind the Rocks Muscle Oxygenation Analysis

Posted by Phil Batterson on Sat, Apr 13, 2019 @ 12:04 PM

In the last blog post, I detailed my adventure through the back country of Utah, in the Behind the Rocks 30k. I explained the training leading up to the race, as well as the race itself, which left me begging for mercy with bilateral hamstring cramps 3 miles from the finish line. During the race, I was wearing a heart rate monitor, and Moxy monitor while also tracking speed, elevation, and running dynamics. In this post I want to explore the biometric data that was collected throughout the race to see if there were any indicators that cramps or decreases in performance were immanent. 

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Topics: Training

Finding the Limiter with Muscle Oxygen Monitoring to Maximize Athletic Performance

Posted by Roger Schmitz on Mon, Dec 31, 2018 @ 14:12 PM

shutterstock_599697680We often talk about identifying physiologic limiters with Moxy.  We can determine if an athlete is limited by oxygen delivery or oxygen utilization and we can further discern if a supply limitation is due to the cardiac or the pulmonary system.

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Topics: Training

Convergence of Moxy and Portable VO2

Posted by Roger Schmitz on Sun, Nov 4, 2018 @ 16:11 PM

sunsport-logo           MetaTrainingLogo

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Topics: Training

Convergencia de Moxy y Portable VO2

Posted by Roger Schmitz on Sun, Nov 4, 2018 @ 16:11 PM

sunsport-logo           MetaTrainingLogo

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Topics: Training

Denis Šketako: A Practical Success Story

Posted by Roger Schmitz on Wed, Feb 24, 2016 @ 08:02 AM

Denis Šketako is a Slovenian triathlete that Moxy has recently begun sponsoring. He has been using Moxy with his trainer, Sašo Rupnik, for the past two years. Here is a short email interview with Denis that tells us a little bit more about him and how Moxy fits into his training.

Denis also made a video that shows how he uses Moxy, which you can check out here.  

1. How did you get interested in the sport of Triathlon, and at what distances do you compete?

I have been training for basketball at local club for 14 years, but I couldn’t see the opportunity for being a professional athlete in that environment, so I decided to find new challenges. Working as a lifeguard for a couple of years, I learned to swim pretty well. I also started with some recreational cycling. One day, the word “Ironman” randomly came to my attention, and I just couldn’t get it out of my mind. I got beaten by the curiosity and decided to give it a go. In 2011, I finished my first Ironman at the age of 21 in 10h 20min, and last year I finished it in 8h 27min.

There are many variations of Triathlon competitions, depending on the length of each discipline. I find my best performance at long distances, i.e. a full Ironman: 3.8 km swim + 180 km bike + 42 km run. To prepare for these races, I sometimes also compete in a half-distance Ironman called Ironman 70.3.

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Topics: Training

Reflection on the National Strength and Conditioning Association Coaches Conference

Posted by Roger Schmitz on Mon, Jan 25, 2016 @ 10:01 AM

Earlier in January, we attended the National Strength and Conditioning Association Coaches Conference in San Antonio, Texas. Using NIRS for assessing the physiologic limiter and guiding the training of endurance athletes is becoming more broadly accepted; using NIRS for Strength and Conditioning Training is less established, but perhaps represents an even larger opportunity for the technology.

Endurance trainers and athletes are used to employing physiologic information like heart rate, blood lactate and VO2 to guide their training. However, these types of physiologic information have not typically provided useful information for S&C training, either because of the time lag between performance and measurement or because of limitations on the practicality of field use of the measurement.

Researchers and S&C trainers are now finding that NIRS provides useful information for guiding training, and that Moxy is a practical device to use in field testing. We’ve seen several applications starting to develop in this space. These include the following:

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Topics: Training

How We Use Moxy for Sport-Specific Assessments and Training

Posted by Brian Kozak on Sat, Oct 25, 2014 @ 07:10 AM

What if you could tell how long an athlete could skate full-out, fully recover, and do it again?

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Topics: Training

Using Moxy for Walking and Running [Infographic]

Posted by Roger Schmitz on Fri, Mar 14, 2014 @ 09:03 AM

Muscle Oxygenation dynamics precisely reflect changes in muscular metabolism and can be used to guide different exercise sessions. The purpose of Moxy during endurance training is to help the user achieve and maintain a training intensity that reflects the desired profile of improvement.

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Topics: Training