Case Study 1: Using Moxy to Dictate Strength Training, Sets, Reps, and Recovery

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, Jan 18, 2019 @ 09:01 AM

In the last blog post, we explored the benefits of strength training as well as outlining how to implement strength training for endurance athletes. In this post I want to provide a personal case study, as to how I am currently using my Moxy Monitor to dictate an endurance/hypertrophy-based weight lifting session. The first weight training session was completed on Dec. 24th, and consisted of 4 sets of 15-20 reps of lunges, renegade rows, Body weight squats, and weighted lunges with 30-90s rest. You can find the heart rate details on TrainingPeaks - here. The goal of the workout was to push SmO2, (with the Moxy on the right v.lateralis) as low as possible within the 15-20reps then recover, until SmO2 reached a peak and started to come back down. 

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Topics: strength training, warm up

How to use Moxy to Monitor Warm-up Status

Posted by Phil Batterson on Sun, Dec 9, 2018 @ 13:12 PM

In Part 1: Creating a Proper Warm-up the principles of a proper warm-up were discussed as well as a simple FTP based warm-up model which allows for the creation of a simple, effective warm-up. A warm-up should leave an athlete feeling invigorated, and prepared both mentally and physically for the hard work ahead, whether that be a race or tough workout. 

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Topics: warm up

Creating a Proper Warm-Up

Posted by Phil Batterson on Fri, Nov 23, 2018 @ 20:11 PM

The purpose of a warm-up is simple: to prepare for the workout or race in the best way possible. A warm-up should leave an athlete feeling invigorated, and prepared both mentally and physically for the hard work ahead. Physiologically, a warm-up literally increases body temperature, allowing for a number of benefits which can lead to enhanced sprint times, jump heights, and time to exhaustion during maximal aerobic exercise (Bishop 2003). The proposed reasons as to why increasing body temperature can lead to better performance are: 1) Increasing power output through accelerating metabolic reactions; 2) allowing muscle and tendons to become more pliable through a decrease in viscoelasticity; and 3) allowing for oxygen to be off-loaded from hemoglobin more readily to active muscle (Bishop 2003). With this in mind one of the main purposes of a proper warm-up should be to increase body temperature without increasing it too much. Unfortunately, many athletes get to the starting line in an ill prepared manner, putting them at a disadvantage before the race has even started.

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Topics: warm up